Top Tips on how to negotiate your salary after a job offer

You have just received a job offer, which is exciting and is the result of an interview process that has taken time and hard work but the salary is not quite what you expect, so whats next? How can you ensure you approach the salary negotiation with a fair-minded attitude that also protects your best interests? Here, we provide some tips and advice:

  1. Research the market. Have a good sense of what is a fair market price for the roles you are seeking e.g. Marketing Week. And apply for the right jobs at the right level. A good recruiter will be able to offer advice and support here.
  2. Firms will typically allocate a specific budget for any given role. If you are then offered the role at say £40,000 don’t immediately come back asking for £50,000. It’s not going to happen no matter how good you think you are.
  3. Speaking of which, be realistic about your skills/experience. If a firm is offering good training, it may be worth accepting a lower offer for the career development opportunities you will get.
  4. There are certainly times when negotiation is necessary – for example, if the offer comes in below your expectations and the salary bracket advertised. In this situation, be professional, outline your concerns and see if there might be movement. A recruiter can be very useful here to act as a fair broker.
  5. If you are in the lucky position of having more than one offer on the table, play it carefully. Yes, you can say that another firm has offered you more in the hope of raising the offer. But only do so for a job you really want, or you may risk a) ending up with the job you didn’t want so much or b) putting off all parties. There is a limit to a firm’s patience on these matters.
  6. Likewise, don’t pretend to have another offer unless it’s 100% true. Firms are not stupid!
  7. Think beyond salary. Firms typically offer a package of benefits beyond just salary. Try to see the big picture.
  8. Also remember that you should not be a finished product when you start a new job. If you meet every requirement of the role and consider yourself to be at the very top end of the salary bracket, it may also be worth considering whether the role will stretch you enough, regardless of salary. It can be easy to allow a good salary to corner you in roles that you have outgrown when it would be better to take a step back, learn new skills and take a bigger career leap forwards long-term. Sideways steps have sometimes been more important in terms of career progression when some of those we have interviewed have looked back on their careers.

Remember, do not to fear any salary negotiation and the confidence to expect a good salary is important. You should go through the interview process with a positive sense of what you are worth and stand by it. But at the same time, thinking ahead, applying for the right jobs at the right level – and then understanding the big picture – should ensure that any salary negotiations you enter are as stress-free as possible.

Good luck and let us know how it goes for you?

 

Developement, Recruitment & Retention, Salary

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